write

My job as a university professor is not simply to teach knowledge but to produce knowledge. Writing and publishing is just as important a task as teaching.

My Latest Book: In Lady Liberty’s Shadow

In Lady Liberty’s Shadow examines popular white fears of immigrants of color and their children’s settlement in suburban communities, as well as fears of the specter that lurks at the edges of suburbs in the shape of black and Latino urban underclasses and the more nebulous hazard of (presumed-Islamic) terrorism that is believed to threaten the “American way of life.” Robyn Magalit Rodriguez explores the impact of anti-immigrant municipal ordinances on a range of immigrant groups living in varied suburban communities. The “American Dream” that suburban life is supposed to represent is shown to rest on a racialized, segregated social order meant to be enjoyed only by whites. Although it focuses primarily on New Jersey, In Lady Liberty’s Shadow offers crucial insights that can shed fresh light on the national immigration debate.

My 1st Book: Migrants for Export

  • Overview
    How the Philippines transformed itself into the world’s leading labor brokerage stateRobyn Magalit Rodriguez investigates how and why the Philippine government transformed itself into what she calls a labor brokerage state, which actively prepares, mobilizes, and regulates its citizens for migrant work abroad. Drawing on ethnographic research of the Philippine government’s migration bureaucracy, interviews, and archival work, Rodriguez presents a new analysis of neoliberal globalization and its consequences for nation-state formation. “Migrants for Export” earned an honorable mention by the Association for Asian American Studies for Best Social Sciences Book published in 2010.
  • Full Details
    Migrant workers from the Philippines are ubiquitous to global capitalism, with nearly 10 percent of the population employed in almost two hundred countries. In a visit to the United States in 2003, Philippine president Gloria Macapagal Arroyo even referred to herself as not only the head of state but also “the CEO of a global Philippine enterprise of eight million Filipinos who live and work abroad.”Robyn Magalit Rodriguez investigates how and why the Philippine government transformed itself into what she calls a labor brokerage state, which actively prepares, mobilizes, and regulates its citizens for migrant work abroad. Filipino men and women fill a range of jobs around the globe, including domestic work, construction, and engineering, and they have even worked in the Middle East to support U.S. military operations. At the same time, the state redefines nationalism to normalize its citizens to migration while fostering their ties to the Philippines. Those who leave the country to work and send their wages to their families at home are treated as new national heroes.Drawing on ethnographic research of the Philippine government’s migration bureaucracy, interviews, and archival work, Rodriguez presents a new analysis of neoliberal globalization and its consequences for nation-state formation.
  • Reviews

     Focusing on the state as organizer of migrations makes legible a reality that often remains veiled in the more common attention on migrants and their households. Robyn Magalit Rodriguez shows us the strong articulation of a business and a political logic in the Philippino state’s organized export of workers. Maintaining the loyalty of its annual average million plus exported workers becomes critical for the state’s business side of these exports. Through her study of the extreme case that is the Philippines, Rodriguez makes a major contribution to our understanding of a range of small and big puzzles in the migration literature.

    —Saskia Sassen, author of Territory, Authority, Rights

     

    Rodriguez has made an important empirical, theoretical and methodological contribution to labour studies specifically and the social sciences in general.

    Global Labour Journal

    This book provides another excellent addition to the growing field of Philippine transnational migration studies that should be read by Asianists, sociologists, geographers, political scientists and migration scholars.

    Pacific Affairs

     

    At a time when many scholars of migration are turning away from political economy, Rodriguez helps us to better understand migration in relation to the transnational processes of our global epoch.

    Science & Society


    Migrants for Export should . . . be key reading for anyone wishing to understand the institutional dynamics that suture together personal histories and global structural forces.

    Signs


     

  • More Info
    For more information please go to my publishers website here.To purchase my book please click here! For more background and reading tips for the book click here!

 

More books!

Asian America (with Pawan Dhingra)

    Asian Americans are the fastest growing minority population in the country. Moreover, they provide a wonderful lens on the experiences of immigrants and minorities in the United States more generally, both historically and today. In this text, Pawan Dhingra and I critically examine key sociological topics through the experiences of Asian Americans, including social hierarchies (of race, gender, and sexuality), work, education, family, culture, identity, media, pan-ethnicity, social movements, and politics.

  • [Dhingra & Rodriguez] succinctly but compellingly present arguments and evidence from different sociological and interdisciplinary approaches, from assimilationist perspectives to critical race theory. The result is an accessible volume that will be a welcome addition to the bookshelves of many social scientists and ethnic studies scholars, as well as their students.
  • –Ethnic and Racial StudiesPawan Dhingra and Robyn Rodriguez, both distinguished scholars with great experience on the subject, offer a highly readable book which explores much more than the content suggested in its title.–LSE Review of Books
  • To purchase, please click here!
  • Transnational Citizenship Across the Americas (edited with Ulla Berg)

  • Mass migrations, diasporas, dual citizenship arrangements, neoliberal economic reforms and global social justice movements have in recent decades produced shifting boundaries and meanings of citizenship within and beyond the Americas. In migrant-receiving countries, this has raised questions about extending rights to newcomers. In migrant-sending countries, it has prompted states to search for new ways to include their emigrant citizens into the nation state.This book situates new practices of ‘immigrant’ and ‘emigrant’ citizenship, and the policies that both facilitate and delimit them, in a broader political–economic context. It shows how the ability of people to act as transnational citizens is mediated by inequalities along the axes of gender, race, nationality and class, both in and between source and destination countries, resulting in a plethora of possible relations between states and migrants. The volume provides cross-disciplinary and theoretically engaging discussions, as well as empirically diverse case studies from countries in Latin America and the Caribbean that have been transformed into ‘emigrant states’ in recent years, offering new concepts and theory for the study of transnational citizenship.This book was originally published as a special issue of Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power. To purchase, click here.
  • Selected additional publications:

    1. Asian/American Auto/biographies co-authored with Vernadette V. Gonzalez
    2. Migrant Heroes: Nationalism, Citizenship and the Politics of Filipino Migrant Labor
    3. The Labor Brokerage State and the Globalization of Filipina Care Workers
    4. (Dis)unity and Diversity in Post-9⁄11 America
    5. Globalization and Third World Women
    6. FilipinasNet co-authored with Vernadette V. Gonzalez

    Migrants for Export is not only an important contribution to scholarship on migration and labour. It also challenges analyses which suggest that states are no longer significant players in a globalized and transnational world. This book deserves to be read in a wide range of disciplines at university and college levels, as well as by organizers and activists involved in immigration and labour (in)justice struggles.

    Labour/Le Travail